Xenia in ancient greece

He does not fear the wrath of the gods because he feels his father will protect him. During the travels of both Odysseus and Telemacus, one can easily see how strangers were greeted and treated upon their arrival to a new place. It was a set of rules and customs that defined the guest-host relationship between two individuals, two groups of people, or an individual and a group Xenia in ancient greece They are rude to not only each other but to Telemachus and the guests, such as disguised Athena and Odysseus.

She took care of his needs and then, afterwards, she even offered a parting gift: Therefore, they decide not to fight, but to continue their hereditary guest-friendship by trading armor. In a new rule, he states that you should not beat your host in a competition because it would Xenia in ancient greece rude and could damage the relationship.

The guest must be courteous to the host and not be a burden. These can be shown from this quote from The Odyssey: She also offered him food and drink. This image also shows how the rules of hospitality apply even when holding someone captive.

Diomedes and Glaucus meet in No man's land. By not respecting the hospitality given by Penelope, they set the stage for their own deaths. He does not fear the wrath of the gods because he feels his father will protect him.

The less advanced methods of transportation used in Homeric times, such as by boat or by foot, were much slower than modern forms of transportation. Since hosts had no way of knowing who their visitors were, they were forced to treat every visitor as if they were a god.

When evening came, Eumaios made a bed for Odysseus and even offered him his own cloak to keep him warm during the night. Reciprocation is given to strangers in hopes that when the hosts are travelers the favor will be returned. Only at the end did he ever try to refuse her hospitality and leave, and even this caused no serious problems.

This statement proves that violence was an acceptable answer when a host was not gracious. From the very nature of this behavior, one can easily come to the conclusion that the people of ancient Greek society were truly hospitable.

They imposed themselves on the household, devouring the livestock, consuming the wine, insulting their host, Telemakhos, and refused to leave when their presence and intentions toward Penelope were obviously not wanted.

Furthermore, Athena advises young Telemachus to take a ship with faithful men and journey to Pylos. Xenia is the Greek relationship between two people from different regions. Why is xenia important to civilization?

Crce also tried to keep Odysseus in her halls and keep him there as her mate, but her attempts failed as well. Fear of Gods Throughout The Odyssey there are many ongoing themes, but one of the most important themes of this story is the tradition of Greek hospitality or xenia.

Hosts welcome travelers into their home in hopes that one day when they are traveling they will be treated with the same hospitality.

So we have to conquer our fear and behave in a friendly way towards strangers anyway.

Talk:Xenia (Greek)

You are most welcome. To maintain order and civility between Greeks from various regions, Greek hospitality was not just a kindness. Therefore we are led to believe that there is some other reasoning behind all of this generosity.Odysseus and Athena. One of the most important themes in The Odyssey is the concept of xenia, which is the old Greek word for hospitality.

In modern times, hospitality is something we rarely think of, and the first thing that comes to mind is the hotel industry, but in ancient Greece, xenia was not about hotels, or just about etiquette, it was a way of life with many benefits in a world that.

As anyone can see, the people from ancient Greece were very hospitable. It is possible, however, that this Greek hospitality comes from the fear of the gods, and not only from pure politeness. It is possible, however, that this Greek hospitality comes from the fear of the gods, and not only from pure politeness.

In ancient Greece, xenia meant “the way you treat strangers or foreigners”. It comes from a very old Proto-Indo-European (Yamnaya) word that means “stranger” but also “guest” and “host” and “foreigner” and sometimes “enemy”.

Xenia is the ancient Greek concept of hospitality, the generosity and courtesy shown to those who are far from home and/or associates of the person bestowing guest-friendship.

Xenia – guests and hosts in ancient Greece

In The Odyssey, Homer suggests that xenia is a very important feature of ancient Greece. Xenia is a kind of code of moral conduct for hospitality. For example, In The Odyssey there are times when reciprocation is given when traveling. Furthermore, the Greek people show xenia because Zeus demands hospitality from humans.

Xenia in Ancient Greece

We will write [ ]. As anyone can see, the people from ancient Greece were very hospitable. It is possible, however, that this Greek hospitality comes from the fear of the gods, and not only from pure politeness. It is possible, however, that this Greek hospitality comes from the fear of the gods, and not only from pure politeness.

Download
Xenia in ancient greece
Rated 4/5 based on 91 review